The Empress of India

The boy assassin

Shot from nowhere

The day was Jan 12th 1857. Lady Genevieve Bell-Hudson was on her way back from a social call to England-house, the EITC headquarter and embassy for the Mughal empire. Lady Bell-Husdon was accompanied by her secretary, Lawrence Mirth. As they were walking in a wide road, Lawrence spotted a 11-12 y.o. muslim kid following their movement through the crowd. The kid was pointing at them with one hand, and waving with the other. Lawrence sensed danger and shoved the ambassador against a nearby wall.

A gun shot came from multiple location because of echoes. Lawrence’s arm exploded shortly below the elbow. The crowd remained stunned for a moment as Gene took to her feet, leaving Lawrence behind. The muslim kids pulled a pistol and trained it on the embassador. Lawrence, ignoring the pain in his left arm, ran through the fleeing bystanders and tackled the boy. The boy let out a shot at Gene which missed and hit a man behind the Englishwoman. Lawrence grappled the boy and forced his pistol to point inward. The gun accidentally went off and shot the boy through his thigh.

Gene, rand back to Lawrence and prompted him to leave. Lawrence insisted in dragging the boy away for first-aid. Both were losing a lot of blood. A passing physician tried to stop the bleeding but both wounds were too angry to be stabilized.

Tourniquets

With the help of other men, Lawrence and the boy were taken to a physician’s office where tourniquets were applied. Lawrence was weaken, but the boy almost went under. Lord Nathan Bell-Hudson was fetched as two men kept the access to the door in case the other shooter would come to finish the hit.

Nathan, Gene’s husband, arrived at the office some 30 minutes later. He summoned the authorities to detain the boy and lead the two shaken English out through a backdoor. They came back to the embassy and barricaded themselves.

The type of violence against English people was unheard of. This reinforced Gene’s conviction that this was the homeland of savages, and that she was better off working from the safety of curtained-off antechambers.

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